Thursday, November 20, 2014

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Cache-misère

The French term "cache-misère" literally means "to hide the misery". A lot of cache-misèring is done for example when moving out of a flat. A bit of paint here, an emergency solution there...

In the rubber stamping world it can mean your stamp falling inked side down on your nearly finished masterpiece - show us your mastery and hide the blunder...

Here, we have an art journal page gone wrong. So hideously wrong, in fact, that I didn't even take a picture of it... little by little I've been adding gesso and left-over paint from other projects on it, and now finally the origininal is covered. Sure, if you know it's under there, you can see it. But only if you know...

The French text often seen on railway stations and rail crossings, "Attention, un train peut en cacher un autre" (Warning, there may be another train behind the one you see), here adapted to the purpose: there maybe "art" behind the "art" you're looking at.


Friday, November 07, 2014

For my sister, love, always.




I cut this frog out of some mag ages ago, and when I say ages I mean years. I intended to make some mail art for my sister with it, but somehow never got to it. I never had the heart to use it for anything else either (how could I, it's my sister's frog!), until today. I love this frog. I love my sis. I've loved both since I've had them. But since I can't have my sis near me, at least I'm keeping the frog!

Monday, November 03, 2014

For all those projects on the table

I got this handy little thing today, in order to organize my desk. Too many projects (work or fun), too many piles of papers. Papers got mixed up, lists on post-its stuck to the wrong documents, it was time to do something. And fast.




And fast it was! And an hour and a half later I had this (front and back):


Yay!

Stamp credits: This and that - Limited Edition; alphabet - unknown

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

The Eila hat



I started knitting Eila-hats from left-over yarn some time ago, and when I put them on my Ravelry page, I'd get people asking me for instructions. First I put up approximative guidelines on the project page, but finally I decided to write it out as a real pattern. The hat is very simple, you can use leftover yarn, and since the width of the stripes will depend on the amount of yarn you have at hand, your hat will be unique.

The pattern is available on Ravelry for the moment, I'll have to see if I can create a downloadable thingie here on the blog...





Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Voyages

Some people knit heaps of sockes, others are specialized in baby clothes, some in blankets. Most handicrafters seem to have a go-to type of project they always have at hand, one that they can do on long car or train rides, one that they don't necessarily need a pattern for anymore.

My go-to project is chemo hats.

A chemo hat is a hat knit or crecheted from non-itchy yarn (I usually use cotton to be sure), donated through a hospital of a cancer center to a cancer patient. It's a gift, and it is of course up to a patient if they want one or not. These hats are very much in demand (and in offer) in Finland, Germany and the US, Canada too I understand. In the US they are collected by special organisations like the Halos Of Hope, in Germany it is one private person who is taking care of the distribution for all of Germany from her home, and in Finland hospitals call out when they come near the end of their stash, and again private people and some yarn shops do the collecting.





I have a couple of go-to patterns, like the "Voyages beanie" by Shara Lambeth. It's perfect for scraps, and no two hats are alike. I get most of my cotton donated from Amis Sans Frontières, a charity group for baby clothes, they use mostly wool themselves so they redirect some of the cotton they receive to other charities, me, for example. So, whenever I go on a trip, I have little mini-skeins of cotton of about the same weight with me, and I crochet as I travel. The Voyages Beanie, to be knit on the road. Perfect :)


Thursday, August 28, 2014

Two big birthdays



Two of my great aunts are celebrating their birthday in September. You sum up their ages and you land near 175 years... They live in an old farm house in the Finnish countryside, take care care of their garden and cats, cook divine food and read a lot. Of course, in winter time, there's less gardening and more reading, and so my mother suggested I knit them shawls as a birthday present.

Said and done, the two sisters will be receiving sister shawls, come September.



Yarn for both shawls: Siena by Wolle Rödel
Patterns: blue: Dark Champagne, red: Kir Royale. Both patterns by Melanie Berg, available on Ravelry)